Apr 122012
 

People have been asking me how they too can be on the exercise program MeMe has been doing for 9 weeks now. So here is the complete rundown.

The program created by neurodevelopmental specialist Susan Phariss is officially called “Have A Ball Learning for ADD/ADHD.”  The exercises are based on Rhythmic Movement Training and work to integrate the primitive reflexes which may have not been suppressed well by the brain at the right developmental stage.

Don’t be thrown off by the title of the program. MeMe does not have ADD or ADHD. But since sensory processing disorder can be so similar to the extent that it can be misdiagnosed as ADD, I thought the program was worth a try. Susan Phariss explained to me that retained primitive reflexes is what causes the symptoms of ADD/HD and SPD that we know so well (hyperactivity, compulsiveness, weak executive function, frustration and meltdowns, etc.) and the difference between ADD/HD and SPD is essentially a matter of which primitive reflexes are retained and in which proportion.

In the real world (as opposed to the virtual one), Susan’s work involves not only ADD/ADHD and sensory processing disorder, but also dyslexia, cerebral palsy, autism, strokes, and different types of learning disorders.

Here is your chance to benefit like I do from the wonderful Have A Ball Learning for ADD/HD program. There are so many wonderful things about it, mainly that it doesn’t take up too much time and that kids love doing the exercises!

For me, convenience is a big issue. Running off every day after school to drop MeMe off at therapy and then to pick him up again, was ruining my daily schedule. My kids are young and resented my leaving, missing an hour of the day with me, and wanted my attention. I like to (and need to for sanity’s sake) keep our daily schedule basically the same, for the good of everyone involved.

Have A Ball Learning was able to fit right into our day! We do it only three times a week and it doesn’t take longer than twenty minutes each time. Sometimes we do it in the morning before school, mostly we do it in the afternoon though, between our dinner-homework routine and the bath-bedtime routine. Sometimes  MeMe’s little siblings like to try some of the exercises and boy do we have fun! It’s a win-win situation- I stay home, the kids get my attention, and MeMe does the exercises happily.

The Have A Ball Learning program comes in video format which makes it easy to learn the exercises over the internet. Each week there is an instructional video where Susan explains the new exercises and then there is the Brain Workout video which is the entire exercise in real time, and you can do the exercises right along with the video. The videos are short, interesting, professional, and very entertaining all at the same time! Because new exercises are always being introduced, MeMe eagerly anticipates our exercise sessions, knowing there is fun in store.

Here are some of MeMe’s favorite exercises: balancing a peacock feather on his hand (or nose or chin 🙂 ), picking up marbles with his toes, being rocked like a baby, and imitation crawling. He starts two new exercises tomorrow and they are fun! I can already hear his laughter when he tries them out.

At the end of each Brain Workout there is a little surprise reward for the child who has completed the entire video! Believe me when I say Susan Phariss has thought of everything to make this program bring results!

To experience the Have a Ball Learning for ADD program for yourself, simply pay a visit to www.haveaballlearning.com. You will be pleasantly surprised to see how easy and fun it all is, and at the same time educational and enlightening.

Susan is starting this online program for the first time now and will only be accepting 10 people into this first round! Learn more at www.haveaballlearning.com!

 

 

 

 Posted by at 7:30 am

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